What Works in Teaching–Writing

What Works is to . . .

Teach writing as the following process:

1. Brainstorming

2. Composing (Drafting)

3. Revising

4. Editing

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Quickies on What Works in Teaching — adprima.com/whatworks.htm
Image — openclipart.org

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What Works in Teaching

Below are some tips for teachers on what works in the classroom. This list can save new teachers a lot of trial-and-error.

  • Brainstorming, composing, revising, and editing is an effective way to teach writing
  • When the words students study are related to familiar experiences and the knowledge they already possess, children learn vocabulary better
  • For young math students, physical objects are used in their lessons helps them learn more effectively
  • Teachers who ask questions that require students to apply, analyze, synthesize and evaluate information in addition to simply recalling facts increase student understanding and achievement

Read the complete list here: Quickies on What Works in Teaching

Free Technology for Teachers

Free Technology for Teachers offers a ton of tech-related resources to educators.

Lesson Plan: The Story of Jeans

The Story of Jeans
(nonfiction), 720 words, Level M (Grade 2)

“Blue jeans are as American as it gets, but do you know who invented them, how they became fashionable, or how they are made? The Story of Jeans answers these questions, taking the reader from the San Francisco Gold Rush to modern-day closets.”

Download The Story of Jeans (pdf)

Lesson Plan for Story of Jeans

More resources including worksheets and quiz (must give email address)

This is a great book for students. I’ve used it with older students as non-fictional filler material. They enjoyed learning a bit of history.

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[Teach the Teacher] Visual Instruction Plans

Visual Instruction Plans

VIPs are a way to present new information to students who don’t seem to understand what to do after you have just finished explaining the material.

VIPs present instructions to a student in “picture” format one step at a time.

The purpose of a VIP is to reduce the amount of time you (the teacher) spends in one-on-one “tutoring” mode. It also helps students to become more independent workers.

First read Weaning the Helpless Handraisers, Part 1 . This will prepare you for the Visual Instruction piece Weaning the Helpless Handraisers, Part 2

And finally, read A More Detailed Article on VIPs with Sample Lesson Plans.

Then, work on creating Visual Instruction Plans for your students.

[Summer Assignment] Prepare Your Welcome Back

All students should be welcomed back into the classroom. Home school classrooms as well.

While you have a little bit of time this summer, develop and finalize a welcome back. Not sure how to do this? Here are a few ideas:

  • Hold a First Day of School celebration
  • Go out and greet them when they arrive at school/homeschool
  • Be visible in hallways
  • Mark your classroom clearly with your name and room number
  • Assign hallway guides and hang directional signs
  • Hang a welcome banner in the classroom —

Harry Wong, author of The First Days of School: How to Be an Effective Teacher,  says that effective teachers (and schools) welcome students back after their summer breaks. And that everyone –teachers, parents, school administrators, principals, janitors, business people, and the community at large– need to be involved in this.

If schools do not begin with the proper, positive expectations, there may not be a Graduation Day for a student.

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